Tristan & Iseult

Friday, 6 February 2015


How's it going?

Although slowly, I'm underway again. And even I have no time for doing everything I want to do, I picked up the pace immediately (incoming idea, take note, search for pieces, try out, ooak!)

This time, another torc-shaped bracelet, "Petit-Crû":

"Petit-Crû" bracelet -SOLD-

Iseult "the blonde", also known as Isolde, Ysolt or Gráinne, is the daughter of the King of Ireland, the bride of Mark, King of Cornwall and the lover of Tristan in the tale of Celtic origin "Tristan and Iseult", included in Arthurian legend.

This tale tells the idyll between the two characters, who symbolically represent the Moon and the Sun. Contrary to what one may think, Tristan personifies the Moon, whereas Iseult embodies the Sun (in Celtic languages the Moon is a masculine word in contrast to the Sun, that it's female.


"Petit-Crû" it's a mythic animal, a charmed toy granted by a fairy to Duke Gilain as a testimony of her love. His magical bell used to eliminate all sadness and fill with happiness to whoever was in its presence.

It appears on the story "The little fairy bell", from the book "The Romance of Tristan and Iseult" by M. Joseph Bedier:

'As Tristan heard it, he was soothed, and his anguish melted away, and he forgot all that he had suffered for the Queen; for such was the virtue of the bell and such its property: that whosoever heard it, he lost all pain. And Tristan thought how good a gift it would make for the Queen. [...]

When the Queen gave it, she watched her sadness and anguish and regrets melted out of her heart.[...] One day she found that it was the little bell that charmed her soul; then she thought: "What have I to do with comfort since he is sorrowing? He could have kept it too and have forgotten his sorrow; but with high courtesy he sent it to me to give me his joy and to take up his pain again. Friend, while you suffer, so long will I suffer also.”

And she took the magic bell and shook it just a little, and then by the open window she threw it into the sea.'

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